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Freehold (732) 294-9393


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Podiatry Services in the Freehold, NJ 07728 area

October 2019

Monday, 28 October 2019 00:00

What Causes Morton’s Neuroma?

Patients who have pain and discomfort in between the third and fourth toes may have a condition that is referred to as Morton’s Neuroma. Additionally, pain can be felt on the on the ball of the foot, and under the toes. This condition is defined as a thickening of nerve tissue, and can cause a sharp, burning pain. A common reason why this ailment may develop can be connected to wearing high heels. This may be a result of not having ample room for the toes to move freely in. Moderate relief may be obtained if lower-heeled shoes are worn. If existing medical conditions are present such as hammertoes or bunions, the likelihood may increase for Morton’s neuroma to develop. After a diagnosis is performed, which typically includes having an X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI taken, the correct treatment process can begin. It is strongly advised to discuss your symptoms with a podiatrist who can offer you correct methods to manage this ailment.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 28 October 2019 00:00

What is Morton's Neuroma?

Morton’s neuroma, (also referred to as Morton’s metatarsalgia, Morton’s neuralgia, plantar neuroma or intermetatarsal neuroma) is a condition that is caused when the tissue around one of the nerves between your toes begins to thicken. This thickening can result in pain in the ball of the foot. Fortunately, the condition itself is not cancerous.

Morton’s neuroma affects women more often than men with a ratio of 4:1. It tends to target women between the age of 50 and 60, but it can occur in people of all ages. There are some risk factors that may put you at a slightly higher risk of developing the condition. People who often wear narrow or high-heeled shoes are often found to be linked to Morton’s neuroma. Additionally, activities such as running or jogging can put an enormous amount of pressure on the ligament and cause the nerve to thicken.

There usually aren’t any outward symptoms of this condition. A person who has Morton’s neuroma may feel as if they are standing on a pebble in their shoe. They may also feel a tingling or numbness in the toes as well as a burning pain in the ball of their foot that may radiate to their toes.

In order to properly diagnose you, the doctor will press on your foot to feel for a mass or tender spot. He may also do a series of tests such as x-rays, an ultrasound, or an MRI. X-rays are usually done to rule out any other causes for your foot pain such as a stress fracture. Ultrasounds are used to reveal soft tissue abnormalities that may exist, such as neuromas. Your podiatrist may want to use an MRI in order to visualize your soft tissues.

There are three main options for treatment of Morton’s neuroma: Injections, decompression surgery, and removal of the nerve. Injections of steroids into the painful area have been proven to help those with Morton’s neuroma. Decompression surgery has been shown to relieve pressure on the affected nerve by cutting nearby structures such as the ligaments in the foot. Another treatment option would be to surgically remove the growth to provide pain relief.

If you suspect that you have Morton’s neuroma you should make an appointment with your podiatrist right away. You shouldn’t ignore any foot pain that lasts longer than a few days, especially if the pain does not improve.

Tuesday, 22 October 2019 00:00

What Are Hammertoes?

Hammertoes are painful deformities that frequently form on the second, third, or fourth toe. The condition is often caused by an issue in foot mechanics. This can be caused by the person’s specific gait or the manner in which they walk, or by shoes that do not comfortably fit the deformity.  Hammertoes can be formed after wearing shoes that are too narrow or short for the foot or have excessively high heels. Shoes that are not properly sized will force the toes into a bent position for long periods of time. This can cause the muscles to shorten and toes to bend into the deformity of a hammertoe.

Hammertoe can also be caused by complications from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, trauma to the foot, heredity, or a cerebral vascular accident. Pain and difficult mobility of the toes, deformities, calluses, and corns are all symptoms of a hammertoe.

Someone who suspects they have the symptoms of a hammertoe should consult with a physician—particularly a podiatrist. Podiatrists diagnose and treat complications of the foot and ankle. If the podiatrist discovers that the affected toes are still flexible, treatment for the hammertoe may simply involve exercise, physical therapy, and better-fitting shoes. Treatment for hammertoes typically involves controlling foot mechanics, such as walking, through the use of customized orthotics.

For more serious cases in which the toes have become inflexible and rigid, surgery may be suggested. During the operation, the toe would receive an incision to relieve pressure on the tendons. A re-alignment of the tendons may then be performed by removing small pieces of bone to straighten the toe. In some cases, the insertion of pins is needed to keep the bones in the proper position as the toe heals. The patient is usually allowed to return home on the same day as the surgery.

If surgery is performed to repair a hammertoe, following the postoperative directions of your doctor is essential. Directions may include several stretches, picking up marbles with your toes, or attempting to crumple a towel placed flat against your feet. Wear shoes that have low heels and a wide amount of toe space to maintain comfort. Closed-toe shoes and high heels should be avoided. Shoes with laces allow the wearer to adjust how fitted he or she may want the shoes to be and also allow for greater comfort. To provide adequate space for your toes, select shoes that have a minimum of one-half inch of space between the tip of your longest toe and the inside of the shoe. This will also relieve pressure on your toes and prevent future hammertoes from forming.

Other preventative measures that can be taken include going shopping for new shoes in the middle of the day. Your feet are its smallest in the morning and swell as the day progresses. Trying on and purchasing new shoes midday will give you the most reliable size. Be sure to check that the shoes you purchase are both the same size. If possible, ask the store to stretch out the shoes at its painful points to allow for optimum comfort.  

Tuesday, 22 October 2019 00:00

Hammertoe May Be Genetic

The toes that are typically affected by hammertoe are the second, third, or fourth toes. Patients who have family members that have this condition may be prone to developing it. It can also come from wearing shoes that do not fit properly, and have inadequate room for the toes to move freely in. This may cause the joints in the second toe to gradually cross over to the toe next to it, and can cause pain and discomfort. Additionally, it may become stiff, and surgery may be a necessary treatment option to have it permanently straightened. Patients sometimes develop a callus that can form on top of the affected toe. This can be a result of friction that comes from the toe rubbing against the shoe. Calluses may also develop on the sole of the foot, and this may happen from chronic stress the foot is under. If you are afflicted with hammertoe, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can properly diagnosis and treat this condition.

Hammertoe

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that affects the joints of the second, third, fourth, or fifth toes of your feet. It is a painful foot condition in which these toes curl and arch up, which can often lead to pain when wearing footwear.

Symptoms

  • Pain in the affected toes
  • Development of corns or calluses due to friction
  • Inflammation
  • Redness
  • Contracture of the toes

Causes

Genetics – People who are genetically predisposed to hammertoe are often more susceptible

Arthritis – Because arthritis affects the joints in your toes, further deformities stemming from arthritis can occur

Trauma – Direct trauma to the toes could potentially lead to hammertoe

Ill-fitting shoes – Undue pressure on the front of the toes from ill-fitting shoes can potentially lead to the development of hammertoe

Treatment

Orthotics – Custom made inserts can be used to help relieve pressure placed on the toes and therefore relieve some of the pain associated with it

Medications – Oral medications such as anti-inflammatories or NSAIDs could be used to treat the pain and inflammation hammertoes causes. Injections of corticosteroids are also sometimes used

Surgery – In more severe cases where the hammertoes have become more rigid, foot surgery is a potential option

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Being a parent involves caring for your child in every way you can. You make sure they are eating the right food, being nice to others, and staying out of any trouble. However, it is also important that you are watchful of their health, more specifically their foot health. Maintaining good foot health in childhood is important in preventing later conditions in life from happening. As children continue to develop, their feet require different techniques of care. Here are some various ways in which you can help your child’s feet stay healthy.

A baby needs a lot of care and attention overall, but the importance of their feet should never be forgotten. Before a baby turns one, their feet change and develop greatly. It is important that during this time, a mother avoids putting tight socks on their child. She should also encourage movement of their feet so the baby can begin to feel more comfortable using them.

As a baby enters the toddler years of his or her life, they are begin to walk around. When your baby begins to take those first steps, it is crucial that they are wearing protective shoes on their feet. As a mother that is observant of your child’s feet, you may notice changes in them. This is completely normal as the feet are becoming susceptible to the activity of walking. It is normal for a toddler to be a bit unsteady or to “walk funny” at first.

When your child grows out of their toddler years, it is important that you begin to show him or her how to care for their feet on their own. Practice with your child proper hygiene in order to prevent foot fungus or infection. Since children are constantly on the move, it is crucial to be cautious of any accidents or injuries that might occur. If an injury occurs, it is advised that you take your child to be examined by a doctor immediately. Since your child is still growing, particular injuries can shift the way in which a bone or other important part of the foot is developing.

Babies and kids are always changing and growing. Your job as a parent is to make sure they stay healthy and making sure they are properly maintained. This involves proper foot care and making sure the feet stay healthy. Following this guide, your child can live a long and happy life.

Monday, 14 October 2019 00:00

When Do Children Begin To Walk?

Babies feet are generally flexible when they are born. There are numerous bones, joints, and ligaments that hold the feet together, and will become stronger as walking begins. This typically happens between eight and eighteen months of age. Research has indicated it is beneficial to have your children walk barefoot while they are indoors. The overall strength of the foot may be developed as a result of the grasping action the toes will provide. When it is time to walk outside, wearing the proper footwear will help the child to balance as the feet become stronger. These shoes should consist of having soles that are flexible and flat, and it is recommended that there is adequate room for the toes to move freely in. If you notice your child’s feet are turning inward or outward, it is advised to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can properly assess your child’s feet.

The health of a child’s feet is vital to their overall well-being. If you have any questions regarding foot health, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tips for Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

  • Make sure their shoes fit properly
  • Look for any signs of in-toeing or out-toeing
  • Check to see if they have Clubfoot (condition that affects your child’s foot and ankle, twisting the heel and toes inward) which is one of the most common nonmajor birth defects.
  • Lightly cover your baby’s feet (Tight covers may keep your baby from moving their feet freely, and could prevent normal development)
  • Allow your toddler to go shoeless (Shoes can be restricting for a young child’s foot)
  • Cut toenails straight across to avoid ingrown toenails
  • Keep your child’s foot clean and dry
  • Cover cuts and scrapes. Wash any scratches with soap and water and cover them with a bandage until they’ve healed.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 09 October 2019 00:00

Corns and Calluses

A corn is a lesion that forms in the skin of the foot, and it is typically circular in shape, small in size, and thick and rough in texture.  A corn generally occurs as a result of repeated pressure on the skin; one example of this is the rubbing of a shoe against the skin.  Corns differ from calluses in that their central cores are harder in texture.

A corn is a relatively common condition with a wide variety of treatment options.  If a corn becomes overly uncomfortable or painful, consult with your podiatrist; he can determine the best method of treatment that is appropriate for you.  Corns may return if the underlying cause of its development is not treated or removed.  Avoid removing corns at home, as improper removal may cause infection.

A callus, similar to a corn, is an area of skin that has become thickened due to repeated pressure and rubbing.  The rubbing causes the skin to create a layer of protective skin, which is the formed callus.  Calluses can differ in size between people, and they can also become painful.

Multiple treatments are available for calluses.  At-home treatment and removal should be avoided, as this can potentially lead to infection.  Your podiatrist can best determine the cause of your calluses and suggest the treatment most appropriate for you. 

Wednesday, 09 October 2019 00:00

Why Do Corns Develop?

A small, hardened portion of skin on top of the toe may be referred to as a corn. It may appear to be yellow, and can cause considerable pain while wearing shoes. They can also form in between the toes, and on the bottom of the feet. A common reason why corns can develop is a result of excess friction that may come from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Patients who are afflicted with corns may find moderate relief when the foot is soaked in warm water. This may help to soften the affected area, followed by filing with a pumice stone. If it is painful to complete daily activities, wearing a corn pad over the corn may provide adequate cushioning that is needed for temporary relief. If you have a corn on any part of your foot, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can offer permanent treatment options.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
Saturday, 05 October 2019 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 01 October 2019 00:00

Wound Care

Diabetics must be wary of all wounds, regardless of depth or size. Diabetes, a chronic disease in which the body cannot properly use glucose the way it normally would, causes various complications that make wounds difficult to heal. Nerve damage or neuropathy will cause diabetics to have trouble feeling the pain of a blister or cut until the condition has significantly worsened or become infected. A diabetic’s weakened immune system can make even the most minor of wounds easily susceptible to infection. Diabetics are also more prone to developing narrow, clogged arteries, and are therefore more likely to develop wounds.

Wounds should be taken care of immediately after discovery, as even the smallest of wounds can become infected if enough bacteria build up within the wound.  To remove dirt, wounds should be first rinsed under running water only. Soap, hydrogen peroxide, or iodine can irritate the injury and should be avoided. To prevent infection, apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover it with a bandage. The bandage should be changed daily. The skin around the wound may be cleaned with soap.

To prevent further exacerbation, see a doctor—especially if you have diabetes. Minor skin conditions can become larger problems if not properly inspected. As the wound heals, make sure to avoid applying pressure to the affected area.

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