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Podiatry Services in the Freehold, NJ 07728 area
Tuesday, 17 May 2022 00:00

Corns, also called clavus, can appear on the toes and feet. The most common place a corn develops is on the side of the pinky toe. A corn is a whitish-yellow hardened patch of dead skin that becomes raised, inflamed, and painful due to repeated exposure to pressure and rubbing. This can happen if shoes are too tight or narrow and rub on the side of the pinky toe, prolonged time spent on the feet, structural problems of the feet or toe bones, or an abnormal gait. Those with diabetes, arthritis, and the elderly are more apt to develop corns. Prevention of corns includes wearing properly fitted shoes, resting feet, keeping feet clean, dry, and moisturized, and trimming toenails regularly. A corn on the pinky toe can be treated at home by soaking the foot in warm water, allowing the corn to soften and lift and/or drying the foot after the soak, and filing it gently with a pumice stone. Medicated corn pads, often containing salicylic acid, can be purchased from drug stores and these provide cushioning of the corn while directly applying medication to dissolve the corn. If these simple home remedies don't help or the corn is unusually painful or infected, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist who can use a properly sterilized surgical blade to shave the dead skin and remove the corn.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Henry Miller of New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Corns and Calluses
Tuesday, 10 May 2022 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of the plantar fascia, the band of fibrous tissue that runs the length of the bottom of the foot to the heel bone. This condition typically develops from over-stretching of that area, and can result in heel and arch pain and heel spurs. Excessive stretching of the plantar fascia can happen for numerous reasons, including flat feet, a sudden increase in physical activity, high body weight and its pressure on the foot, and footwear that is ill fitting. Pain with plantar fasciitis is often its worst first thing after arising from sleep and can diminish a bit as the day wears on. Treatments might be orthotics to reduce over-pronation, cushioning the heel to absorb shock, wearing supportive shoes that accommodate the foot well, losing weight, stretching exercises, and night splints. Since it is vital to determine the cause of plantar fasciitis to treat it properly, it is suggested that a podiatrist be consulted for evaluation.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Tuesday, 03 May 2022 00:00

If one’s diabetes is not carefully managed through diet, exercise, and insulin treatment, an all-too-common complication can be a foot ulcer. Ulcers develop because skin tissue breaks down and layers of skin underneath are exposed due to poor circulation, high blood sugar, nerve damage, and irritated or hurt feet. Foot ulcers usually develop under big toes or the balls of the feet. Symptoms to watch for are unusual swelling, irritation, redness, discoloration, drainage from the foot, and odors emanating from the feet. The most visible sign of a foot ulcer is when black tissue (known as “eschar”) surrounds the ulcer because of poor blood flow to the area. However, signs of a foot ulcer are not always present or obvious. Good foot care, including wearing properly fitting, quality shoes, maintaining good foot hygiene, proper trimming of toenails, as well as attention paid to other aspects of physical health, such as heart and kidney disease and obesity, can help with the prevention of foot ulcers. Treatment depends on the cause and severity of the ulcer. It is highly suggested to consult with a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and to obtain a treatment plan.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 26 April 2022 00:00

The metatarsals are long bones in the foot that link the toes with the heel and arch. When these metatarsal bones are repeatedly stressed over time (as opposed to a sudden or acute injury), a stress fracture can occur. The second and third metatarsals are the most commonly injured, and can occur more frequently in military recruits, athletes and dancers who run and jump regularly. Metatarsal stress fractures can be caused by overtraining, long-distance running, having poor body mechanics or running form, pushing your body beyond your fitness level, or training with improper footwear or on hard surfaces. Having diabetes or certain forms of arthritis can also increase your risk factors, as can vitamin D or calcium deficiencies. Signs of a metatarsal fracture include pain in the metatarsal(s), as well as tenderness, or swelling in the area. If you have symptoms like these, it is suggested that you stop participating in physical activity until you can be examined and evaluated by a podiatrist. If you do have a metatarsal fracture, your podiatrist may treat it with rest, stretching and/or muscle strengthening exercises, icing, immobilization, casting, prescription footwear, and more.


 

Stress fractures occur when there is a tiny crack within a bone. To learn more, contact Dr. Henry Miller from New Jersey. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain free and on your feet.

How Are They Caused?

Stress fractures are the result of repetitive force being placed on the bone. Since the lower leg and feet often carry most of the body’s weight, stress fractures are likely to occur in these areas. If you rush into a new exercise, you are more likely to develop a stress fracture since you are starting too much, too soon.  Pain resulting from stress fractures may go unnoticed at first, however it may start to worsen over time.

Risk Factors

  • Gender – They are more commonly found in women compared to men.
  • Foot Problems – People with unusual arches in their feet are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Certain Sports – Dancers, gymnasts, tennis players, runners, and basketball players are more likely to develop stress fractures.
  • Lack of Nutrients – A lack of vitamin D and calcium may weaken the bones and make you more prone to stress fractures
  • Weak Bones – Osteoporosis can weaken the bones therefore resulting in stress fractures

Stress fractures do not always heal properly, so it is important that you seek help from a podiatrist if you suspect you may have one. Ignoring your stress fracture may cause it to worsen, and you may develop chronic pain as well as additional fractures.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Freehold, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle
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